General Information About Notice

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***PLEASE READ BEFORE USING THIS DOCUMENT***

The following document ONLY applies to jurisdictions in Kentucky that have enacted the Uniform Residential Landlord Tenant Act. These jurisdictions are: Barbourville, Bellevue, Bromley, Covington, Dayton, Florence, Lexington-Fayette County, Georgetown, Louisville-Jefferson County, Ludlow, Melbourne, Newport, Oldham County, Pulaski County, Shelbyville, Silver Grove, Southgate, Taylor Mill and Woodlawn.

If you do NOT live in one of these jurisdictions, please do not rely on this document for legal advice.

Further, this information only applies to residential leases. It does not apply to: commercial units, properties under contract for sale, hotels or motels, or people who are employed by the landlord.


Prior to filing an eviction action against you, a landlord must provide you with proper notice. There are three different possible lease breaches and your landlord must give you a different kind of notice for each breach.

Non-Payment of Rent

This is the most common kind of lease breach. Your landlord must give you a 7-day notice for this breach.

This notice must do the following:

  • State the amount of money you owe
  • Give you at least seven days to pay the money.
  • State that if you do not pay the amount you lease will be terminated (or eviction proceedings will begin)

If your landlord does not provide you with a notice that states those things, he may not evict you for non-payment. You can send him this letter to let him know this.

Non-financial Breach

This kind of breach encompasses any behavior prohibited by your lease. Oftentimes it involves having a pet, criminal activity or disturbing the neighbors. Your landlord must give you a 14-day notice for this breach.

This notice must do the following

  • State how you have breached the lease
  • Give you 14 days to cure the violation (unless you have another breach for the same behavior within the past six months - then you can only receive a 14-day notice to leave, with no right to cure)
  • State that if you do not cure the violation, the lease will be terminated (or eviction proceedings will begin)

If your landlord does not provide you with a notice that states those things, he may not evict you for a non-financial breach. You can send him this letter to let him know this.

End of Tenancy

This kind of breach occurs when you stay at your residence after you lease is over. In order to terminate at the end of a year lease, most courts hold that your landlord must give you a 30-day notice. Your landlord also needs to give you a 30-day notice to end a month-to-month lease. Your landlord needs to give you a 7-day notice to end a week-to week lease.

The notice must do the following:

  • Let you know that they wish to end your lease
  • Give you thirty (or seven) days from the beginning of your periodic rental date (usually the day you pay rent)
    FOR EXAMPLE:
    If your rent is paid on the first of the month:
    Your landlord's notice on May 14, 2009 must state that you have until June 30, 2009 to vacate.
    BUT
    Your landlord's notice on May 1, 2009 may give you until only May 30, 2009.
  • State that if you do not move, an eviction will be filed.

If your landlord does not provide you with a notice that states those things, he may not evict you. You can send him this letter if you have a month-to-month lease, or this letter if you have a week-to-week lease, to let him know this.



Reviewed August 2009